Facts on the US Department of Energy T12 Ban on inefficient fluorescent tubes

See the facts of the T12 Ban and how USA Made LED Tubes come with promotions from one of the leading American LED Light Manufacturers.

Independence LED has provided this content as a convenience to the members of our Authorized Reseller Network to help clarify the details in speaking with business owners and operators about the ban on T12 fluorescent tubes that started on June 14, 2012.

See CASH for CLUNKERS Lighting  for information on the multi-million dollarincentive program.

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T12 Ban Support: Independence LED welcomes the T12 Ban since it will encourage business owners and property managers to rethink their current fluorescent lighting in exchange for more energy efficient options like LED Tube technology.

U.S. Department of Energy T12 Ban: Fact Sheet

Impact of Amended Energy Conservation Standards on General Service Fluorescent Lamps: T12 Ban FACT SHEET

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 amendments to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act established energy conservation standards for certain classes of general service fluorescent lamps/tubes Energy Policy Act amendments starting with Sec. 123 of the Act on the FERC website.) The amendments also direct the Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct two cycles of review to determine if the standards needed to be updated. DOE completed the first review, determined that the standards needed to be updated according to the legal requirements, and published the amended standards on July 14, 2009. 74 FR 34080. (See the 2009 Lamp Rule at the Appliance Standards website).

Note: These amended standards have a compliance date of July 14, 2012 for manufacturers or importers of covered general service fluorescent lamps.

The amended energy conservation standards, which are performancebased, do not explicitly prohibit the sale of T12 diameter lamps. Based on DOE’s analysis, however, most commercially-available T12 lamps are too inefficient to meet the amended standards and can no longer be manufactured for distribution in commerce after July 14, 2012. In addition, if a consumer replaces an existing T12 system with a more-efficient T8 or T5 diameter system, he or she may need to purchase a new ballast or fixture. Even with this additional cost, however, DOE has determined that increasing the energy conservation standards will save consumers money overall.

NB: This standard is NOT related to the general service incandescent lamp-related provisions in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007). Those standards go into effect on January 1, 2012 (See Jan ’12 FACT SHEET at the Appliance Standards website.) Below are details of the July 2012 GSFL standards.

 

INFORMATION ON JULY 2012 AMENDED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR GENERAL SERVICE FLUORESCENT LAMPS

  1. What types of fluorescent lamps are subject to these amended (July 2012) energy conservation standards?

4-foot medium bipin, 2-foot U-shaped, 8-foot slimline, 8-foot high output, 4-foot miniature bipin standard output, and 4-foot miniature bipin high output GSFLs are subject to amended (July 14, 2012) energy conservation standards. Some special purpose (such as cold temperature and impact resistant) lamps are excluded from regulation. These exclusions are listed in the definition of “general purpose fluorescent lamp” which is reproduced at the end of this document.

  1. What are the amended (July 2012) standards for GSFLs?

Lamp/Tube type  and Correlated color temperature (CCT)

Minimum average lamp efficacy (lm/W)

2 Foot Tubes

2-foot U-shaped ≤4,500K (Must have at least 84 lm/W)

2-foot U-shaped >4,500K and ≤7,000K = (Must have at least 81 lm/W)

 

4 Foot Tubes

4-foot medium bipin ≤4,500K (Must have at least 89 lm/W)

4-foot medium bipin >4,500K and ≤7,000K (Must have at least 88 lm/W)

4-foot miniature bipin standard output ≤4,500K (Must have at least 86 lm/W)

4-foot miniature bipin standard output >4,500K and ≤7,000K (Must have at least 81 lm/W)

4-foot miniature bipin high output ≤4,500K (Must have at least 76 lm/W)

4-foot miniature bipin high output >4,500K and ≤7,000K (Must have at least 72 lm/W)

 

8 Foot Tubes

8-foot slimline ≤4,500K (Must have at least 97 lm/W)

8-foot slimline >4,500K and ≤7,000K (Must have at least 93 lm/W)

8-foot high output ≤4,500K (Must have at least 92 lm/W)

8-foot high output >4,500K and ≤7,000K (Must have at least 88 lm/W)

 

  1. What types of GSFLs will be available after the amended standards become effective in July 2012?

GSFLs that will likely be available on the market include high-efficacy T8 lamps and T5 lamps. Certain models of GSFLs (such as some T12s) are likely to become unavailable because, as currently designed, they are too inefficient to meet the prescribed efficacy level.

  1. Must manufacturers continue to comply with color rendering index (CRI) standards after July 2012?

Yes. The CRI standards in the current energy conservation standards will not be superseded by the amended efficacy standards. The CRI standard levels were prescribed by statute, and they remain as an independent requirement.

INFORMATION ABOUT CURRENT ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR GSFLs

 

  1. What are current energy conservation standards for GSFLs?

Lamp type; Nominal lamp wattage; Minimum CRI; Minimum average lamp efficacy

 

2-foot U-shaped;  >35W; 69 CRI;  68 lm/W

2-foot U-shaped; ≤35W; 45 CRI; 64 lm/W

 

4-foot medium bipin; >35W; 69 CRI; 75 lm/W

4-foot medium bipin; ≤35W; 45 CRI; 75 lm/W

 

8-foot slimline; >65W; 69 CRI; 80 lm/W

8-foot slimline; ≤65W; 45 CRI; 80 lm/W

8-foot high output; >100W; 69 CRI; 80 lm/W

8-foot high output; ≤100W; 45 CRI; 80 lm/W

 

  1. What fluorescent lamps are exempt from the current standards?

In addition to 4-foot miniature bipin standard output and 4-foot miniature bipin high output lamps not being subject to the current standards, the following lamps are exempt:

(1) Any 4-foot medium bipin lamp or 2-foot U-shaped lamp with a rated wattage less than 28 watts;

(2) Any 8-foot high output lamp not defined in ANSI C78.81 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3) or related supplements, or not 0.800 nominal amperes; or

(3)Any 8-foot slimline lamp not defined in ANSI C78.3 (incorporated by reference; see §430.3).

  1. Are GSFLs with a CRI equal to or greater than 82 but less than 87 subject to the current standards?

Yes. EISA 2007 changed the definition of GSFL to include these lamps. DOE recently issued GUIDANCE explaining the applicability of the current standards to these lamps.

  1. LEGAL DEFINITION OF “FLUORESCENT LAMP” AND “GENERAL SERVICE FLUORESCENT LAMP”

 

10 CFR 430.2 defines a “fluorescent lamp” as follows:

Fluorescent lamp means a low pressure mercury electric-discharge source in which a fluorescing coating transforms some of the ultraviolet energy generated by the mercury discharge into light, including only the following:

 

(1) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot medium bipin lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length of 48 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;

(2) Any U-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 2-foot U-shaped lamps) with medium bipin bases of nominal overall length between 22 and 25 inches and rated wattage of 25 or more;

(3) Any rapid start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot high output lamps) with recessed double contact bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches;

(4) Any instant start lamp (commonly referred to as 8-foot slimline lamps) with single pin bases of nominal overall length of 96 inches and rated wattage of 52 or more;

(5) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to as 4-foot miniature bipin standard output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 26 or more; and

(6) Any straight-shaped lamp (commonly referred to 4-foot miniature bipin high output lamps) with miniature bipin bases of nominal overall length between 45 and 48 inches and rated wattage of 49 or more.

10 CFR 430.2 defines a “general service fluorescent lamp” as follows:

General service fluorescent lamp means any fluorescent lamp which can be used to satisfy the majority of fluorescent lighting applications, but does not includeany lamp designed and marketed for the following nongeneral application:

(1) Fluorescent lamps designed to promote plant growth;

(2) Fluorescent lamps specifically designed for cold temperature applications;

(3) Colored fluorescent lamps;

(4) Impact-resistant fluorescent lamps;

(5) Reflectorized or aperture lamps;

(6) Fluorescent lamps designed for use in reprographic equipment;

(7) Lamps primarily designed to produce radiation in the ultra-violet region of the spectrum; and

(8) Lamps with a Color Rendering Index of 87 or greater.

 

Contact: Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D.
Lighting Standards Team Leader
(202) 287-1393  Tina.Kaarsberg@ee.doe.gov
March 23, 2011

Support Information:

The DOE GUIDANCE explaining the applicability of the current standards to these lamps.

 

REGULATION OF GENERAL SERVICE FLUORESCENT LAMPS WITH COLOR RENDERING INDICES GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO 82 AND LESS THAN 87 Issued: March 22, 2011

The Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) regulates the energy efficiency of General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFLs) pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 6295(i) and 10 C.F.R. § 430.32(n). The Department’s regulation of GSFLs is limited to products that fall within the definition of “General Service Fluorescent Lamp” contained at 42 U.S.C. § 6291(30)(B) and 10 C.F.R. § 430.2. That definition excludes eight categories of lamps from coverage, one of which is “Lamps with a Color Rendering Index [CRI] of 87 or greater.”

Prior to the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), the definition of GSFL excluded lamps with a CRI of 82 or greater. However, section 316(b) of EISA 2007 amended the definition of GSFL at 42 U.S.C. § 6291(30)(B)(viii) by striking “82” and inserting “87.” (Although the heading to section 316(b) indicated that this change was to the definition of “Fluorescent Lamp,” the nature of the change and the statutory reference made clear that the change was to the definition of “General Service Fluorescent Lamp.”) On March 23, 2009, the Department incorporated this statutory change into its own definition of GSFL contained at 10 C.F.R. § 430.2. 74 Fed. Reg. 12,058, 12,062.

Section 316(b) of EISA 2007 did not provide a separate effective date, and, thus, this amendment took effect one day after EISA 2007 was enacted, i.e., December 20, 2007. EISA 2007 § 1601. Since that date, therefore, GSFLs with a CRI equal to or greater than 82 but less than 87 have been subject to the applicable standards enacted by Congress for minimum average lamp efficacy.

The Department has recently become aware of confusion in the industry regarding whether the revised definition of GSFL is presently effective. Regulated parties have referred to the Department’s general practice of providing substantial notice before new products are subject to regulation. While it is true that the Department customarily provides future compliance dates for new products being made subject to energy conservation standards – and often is statutorily mandated to provide such time – in this case, the Department is without power to do so. That is because Congress changed the statutory definition of GSFL and elected to make that change effective immediately. Moreover, the new definition of GSFL has been publicly accessible in the U.S. Code for over three years and in the Department’s regulations for two years.

Nevertheless, because a review of products on the market reveals that confusion on this issue is widespread, the Department will forebear for 90 days from initiating any civil penalty action for GSFLs with a CRI of 82 or greater. Within 90 days of this notice, the Department expects all GSFLs with a CRI equal to or greater than 82 but less than 87 that are manufactured in or imported into the United States to be certified as compliant with the applicable Federal standards.